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#100760 - Mon, 09 Jan 2017 20:13:57 Record Collecting- Things We Should Have Kept!
Gwilym Offline
Pass level: Promoter

Registered: Sun, 25 Jun 2006 19:00:00
Posts: 248
Loc: Wales.
I've been meaning to start this thread for a while and since the forum has lately been a bit quiet I thought that now would be a good time.

My record collecting began in the late 80s, and back then, when my preferences and favorites were still being established, I was buying all sorts of interesting secondhand vinyl at boot sales, market stalls. etc. Once I'd gotten them home I'd usually have a quick listen and, if the music didn't grab me immediately, the item would go swiftly into a pile that I'd eventually use for part exchange on the next shopping trip. In retrospect there were some items that I really wish I'd been less hasty to get rid of.

For instance, I remember buying a mint condition white label copy of the (pre-Messengers) Modern Man LP "Concrete Scheme" from a local record shop in 1990. They'd had it in stock ever since it had been released ten years earlier, although how they'd been sent a white label copy instead of a regular one I don't know. I gave it a quick spin when I got home and immediately decided that Wastelands was the only track I really liked. So I taped that one song onto cassette and put the LP in the part-ex pile. Regretting that decision years later, I was lucky enough to find another mint copy online, although this one was unfortunately just the regular pressing.

Also in the early 90s I came across a virtually mint copy of the rare Neutron Records compilation EP "1980: The First Fifteen Minutes" (with a minimal electronic track by the pre-ABC band Vice Versa) for just 50p, complete with its original postcard. As with the above example, I played it...didn't really get it...got rid of it. cry

Two other great examples were an MFSL half-speed mastered LP of Jarre's "Equinoxe" album and the rare 1973 electronic library LP "100% Electronic" by Eddie Warner, the latter costing me just 1 in a charity shop! Needless to say I didn't hang on to them and to purchase decent copies of both nowadays you'd need about 200. Aaaargh!!!

Do any other collectors on the forum have similar sad tales to tell?


Edited by Gwilym (Tue, 10 Jan 2017 16:40:56)

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#100763 - Wed, 11 Jan 2017 06:35:07 Re: Record Collecting- Things We Should Have Kept! [Re: Gwilym]
Giulio Offline
Pass level: VIP

Registered: Mon, 26 Dec 2016 10:12:21
Posts: 2
Hello Gwilym and thanks for the interesting Post. This is my first in a long time, and I've had to Re-Register as I joined the Forum in 2012, when data files were lost from the Forum until it was renewed again last year.

I started listening to music regularly in the mid 'Seventies, and I was barely a teenager. I didn't know where to start or what to listen to, so I bought some vinyl and cassettes (CD's were at least ten years from being introduced) of Various Artists records. The first artist that I enjoyed several songs from was ABBA. The very first single artist LP record in my collection was their self-titled album.

Even though I had a very modest record collection, only a few dozen albums, I took care not to over-play them, as I was conscious that the vinyl was being degraded every time I played it. We had an old Garrard turntable, with a chisel for a stylus.

When CD's came along in the 80's, it was a godsend. I could now play them as often as I wished, without the wear. I've still got those old records, I couldn't bring myself to dispose of them.

Coming to the subject matter of the Thread, my musical knowledge in the Eighties and Nineties was not of today. When I hear a recording, the first thing I notice is the quality of the recording expressed through mastering, then the musical content.

For me, if the sound quality isn't there (I'll re-post my article on 'Audio Quality' shortly) then it ruins even a good performance. It's akin to putting gauze or cloth over a speaker.

But in the 'Nineties, remasters of CD's started to happen, often with bonus tracks. At the time, I couldn't hear through the boosts in frequency levels. What seemed, at the time, a punchier remaster left the original CD recording seeming drab and flat. I didn't know about listener fatigue (there was too much happening in my life to listen for very long) or that you could turn up the volume of those seemingly flat original CD's which would then come alive, without the fatigue (I was very considerate of other people and neighbours, not wanting to bother them).

And so, ensnared by 'Remasters' I sold off some original pressing CD's; ABBA, Foreigner, Jarre, Marillion ('Fish' era), Rush, Sting, and the first four albums by Richard Thompson. And even an original pressing of 'Vienna' for the EMI 20th Anniversary remaster.

But probably the most valuable CD I sold was the MFSL remaster of 'A Very Special Christmas' which sells for three figures (and more). I didn't think that much of the album, at the time. I also sold off two other MFSL's; Manhattan Transfer's 'Extensions' and Bob Marley's 'Exodus' for the same reason.

The moral of this tale: hang on to your original pressings!

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#100766 - Wed, 11 Jan 2017 12:02:13 Re: Record Collecting- Things We Should Have Kept! [Re: Giulio]
Gwilym Offline
Pass level: Promoter

Registered: Sun, 25 Jun 2006 19:00:00
Posts: 248
Loc: Wales.
Originally Posted By Giulio
The moral of this tale: hang on to your original pressings!



Couldn't agree more! smile

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